F.A.Q.'s

What Is Going Raw? How Do You Start? Do You Just Eat Grass? Listen and Take Heed....

The biggest misconception about going fully raw is that people assume that you are "starving yourself" or that "you are not getting enough nutrients or food" or that "10 bananas a day?!?!? are you insane? that is too much potassium!" or "you need meat" or just flat out, "you're insane". I can not help but to laugh at these when I tell someone that I am on a fully raw lifestyle. It shows that there is no open door in the mind of such individuals that feel that necessity for meat, eggs, dairy, wheat, sugar, milk and other things that do harm to your body because of what is hidden behind the label. The more that you are aware, the more that you are AWARE. Starting a fully raw lifestyle (not a diet) is not only beneficial and healing, but it is also cheaper than one many think.​

Q:

What Is The Difference Between

Raw Vegan 

and

Vegan?

What Is The Difference Between

Raw Vegan 

and

Vegan?

A: Raw veganism is a diet that combines the concepts of veganism and raw foodism. It excludes all food and products of animal origin, as well as food cooked at a temperature above 117 °F. A raw vegan diet includes raw vegetables and fruits, nuts and nut pastes, grain and legume sprouts, seeds, plant oils, sea vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, and fresh juices. There are many different versions of the diet, including fruitarianism, juicearianism, and sproutarianism. In addition to the ethics of eating meat, dairy, eggs and honey, raw vegans may be motivated by health, spiritual, financial, or environmental reasons, or any combination of these. The gourmet approach to raw veganism typically use dehydrators to "cook" food like crackers, and make dishes such as nut cheeses, "pasta" (usually zucchini cut as long curly strips), "soups", or green smoothies. There are many raw vegan cook books in the market and recipes online. An issue with the gourmet approach is the overconsumption of fat, since by avoiding meat and cooked starchy foods such as bread and pasta, and consuming typical amounts of fruit (i.e. a few portions a day), calories are mostly obtained from fat in the form of nuts and seeds, oily salad dressing, nut cheeses, and avocados.Raw vegans who follow a low fat approach to raw veganism seek a very specific nutritional balance of carbohydrates/protein/fat ratio from their diet, trying to ensure they have a sufficient intake of calories, and placing greater importance in those ratios than in their foods being raw. Most low fat raw vegans (LFRVs) follow an 80/10/10 ratio, and some a more lax 70/10/20 or more strict 90/5/5, trying to achieve between 2000 and 3000 calories per day, averaged per week, and according to exercise levels (some athletes consume an average of 6000 calories per day). Obtaining such high amount of calories from carbohydrates from raw foods requires consuming large quantities of sweet and ripe fruit, such as bananas, dates, generally blended/juiced. Considering that a typical banana provides 100 calories, a LFRV following a typical 3000-calorie regime requiring 80% of the calories coming from carbohydrates must consume 2400 calories of banana daily, i.e. 24 bananas, or 48 dates, or 5.3 litres of orange juice, which provides almost all the required intake of protein and fat to satisfy the ratio. Most LFRV also consume a large low fat salad daily to ensure the required protein, mineral and vitamin daily intake is covered. The low fat raw vegan lifestyle has been tried by several athletes.  Raw food will have higher contents of intact enzymes, acids and proteins as chemistry dictates these fragile nutrients denaturate during extreme conditions and temperatures of cooking.Raw vegans must ensure that their intake of vitamin B12 is adequate, since it does not occur reliably in plant foods.  Vitamin B12 deficiency can have serious consequences such as anemia and neurodegenerative disease. The Vegan Society and Vegan Outreach, among others, recommend that vegans either consistently eat foods fortified with B12 (such as nutritional yeast) or take a B12 supplement. Tempeh, seaweed,spirulina, organic produce, soil, and intestinal bacteria have not been shown to be reliable sources of B12 for the dietary needs of vegans.Vitamin D deficiency is possible due to the absence of dairy products, which are normally fortified with vitamin D, but preventable with the usage of supplements and time spent outdoors. (source: Vegan Outreach) Veganism is a diet in which no any animal and byproducts are consumed: eggs, dairy, cheese, meats. They do it cooked meals.

Q:

So...

what inspired you to

go fully raw?

A: I was introduced to the vegan lifestyle by my best friend in high school. I was a carnivore at the time and within a month, I became a vegetarian. I did not crave red meat (especially when I found out that it takes such a long time to break down in your system) and started eating only fish, chicken and turkey. I loved fruit and veggies from the start, so that was not difficult. It was when I went to a concert to see the band, Emery, that I immediately said I was DONE with meat......PERIOD. The band members are vegan and against cruelty to animals. During the break, they had videos playing at their merch table that showed what happened to animals that go to slaughter and then become perfectly packaged and placed into grocery stores. Girls were crying, guys were mortified and I at that moment, I became a vegan. It was not until recently after my husband was diagnosed with a muscular degenerative disease that I did some research into diets that help to keep what muscle is left and slow the rapid progression. All my research pointed to a fully raw diet and the benefit that the body reaps. At that moment, with my husband in my thoughts and my health ailments (anemia, edema, and more), we both decided to go fully raw.....and it has been the decision that one could ever make. I have been vegan for 15 years, raw vegan for 3 years and loving it.

Q:

SO,

it must

be hard.

is it

hard?

A: Hard? No. Challenging? For some. You want to make sure that you ease into it. Also, do your research. Even though there are many benefits, if your goal is just to lose weight and want it fast, then this is probably not the best option for you. Yes, you will lose weight but make sure that you have the intent of going raw to improve your health.

A: Uhmmmm....yes...it...does. The big deal is that processed food is dangerous. As much as you want to grab nuggets from McDonald's, it is not "chicken". For $5 buks worth of junk food, you could by that same amount of an abundance of fruits or veggies for lunch. Go to the grocery store and read the label.....actually READ it. Artificial flavoring, chemicals, high fructose corn syrup, and more wonderful toxins sprinkled with GMO sound so appetizing, right? Treat your body as a temple......not a time bomb.

Q:

UGH...WHAT IS THE BIG DEAL? IT DOES not even matter. eating healthly is so expensive.

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